Cultural diversity and mental wellbeing

Cultural diversity and mental wellbeing

Cultural diversity and mental wellbeing

Culturally responsive and safe service provision is not only ethical but has been shown to be more effective in meeting young people and family’s mental health and wellbeing needs.

For a brief description of the content covered in the resources, please scroll down.

  • Orygen's ‘Culture 101’ clinical practice point introduces a definition for culture with some practical considerations.
  • Our Glossary ensures terms used throughout the resources are clearly and consistently defined in order to make resources useful and understandable.
  • The ‘Lets Talk’ podcast explores the relationship between culture, mental wellbeing and service provision through engaging interviews with young people and staff in the sector.
  • Our Working together videos introduce the important role of language, shared understanding and meaning in youth mental health settings, providing mental health workers with practical considerations for how language interpreters can be effectively included and utilised.
  • The Youth participation with young people from multicultural backgrounds toolkit introduces the benefits of including multicultural young people in service development and design, with some case examples and practical considerations.
  • Our In this together: families and carers can ask factsheet supports services and mental health staff to invite questions and promote collaborative discussion with multicultural carers and families about how best to support their young person.
  • The In this together: families and carers can ask, unpacked webinar hears from specialist family workers and specialist family peer workers about key approaches and values that guide collaborative work with multicultural families.
  • The Valuing cultural diversity and inclusion in youth mental health practice guide looks at individual, team and organisational approaches that can support cultural responsiveness and safety between colleagues, within organisations and across service systems.
  • The Intersectionality factsheet recognises the way in which mental health workers can embrace and support the multiple identities of young people as they seek support, developing an awareness for the impact that multiple experiences of oppression can have on mental wellbeing and experiences of services.

We encourage further learning through reading, consultation, supervision and practice. We would like to thank everyone who contributed to this project: their contributions made visible on the Project overview and acknowledgement page, along with an overview of the 2019-2021 project.

If you have any feedback on these resources, please contact: training@orygen.org.au